The trading Example
Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) 8
The Java EE Tutorial

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The trading Example

The trading example demonstrates how to implement and use a simple outbound resource adapter that submits requests to a legacy EIS using a TCP socket. The example demonstrates the scenario in Figure 56-1 and consists of the following modules:

  • trading-eis: A Java SE program that simulates a legacy EIS

  • trading-rar: The outbound resource adapter implementation

  • trading-war: A web application that uses the resource adapter

  • trading-ear: An enterprise archive that contains the resource adapter and the web application

Figure 56-1 The trading Example

This figure shows the trading example components: a deployed WAR and RAR that communicate with the EIS over a TCP socket.

The trading-eis module is an auxiliary project that resembles a legacy stock trading execution platform. It contains a Java SE program that listens for trading requests in plain text on a TCP socket. The program replies to trading requests with a status value, a confirmation number, and the dollar amounts for the requested shares and fees. For example, a request-response pair would look like this:

>> BUY 1000 ZZZZ MARKET
<< EXECUTED #1234567 TOTAL 50400.00 FEE 252.00

The trading-rar module implements the outbound contract of the Java EE Connector Architecture to submit requests and obtain responses from the legacy stock trading execution platform. The trading-rar module provides and implements a custom client interface for Java EE applications to use. This interface is simpler than the Common Client Interface (CCI).

The trading-war module is a web application with a JavaServer Faces interface and a managed bean. This application enables clients to submit trades to the EIS using the resource adapter provided by the trading-rar module. The trading-war module uses the custom client interface provided by the resource adapter to obtain connections to the EIS.

Using the Outbound Resource Adapter

In most cases, Java EE application developers use outbound resource adapters developed by a third party. Outbound resource adapters either implement the Common Client Interface (CCI) or provide a custom interface for applications to interact with the EIS. Outbound resource adapters provide Java EE applications with the following elements:

  • Connection factories

  • Connection handles

  • Other interfaces and objects specific to the EIS domain

Java EE applications obtain an instance of the connection factory via resource injection and then use the factory object to obtain connection handles to the EIS. The connection handles enable the application to make requests and obtain information from the EIS.

The trading-rar module provides a custom client interface that consists of the classes listed in Table 56-1.

Table 56-1 Classes and Interfaces in the javaeetutorial.trading.rar.api Package

API Component

Description

TradeOrder

Represents a trade order for the EIS

TradeResponse

Represents a response from the EIS to a trade request

TradeConnection

Represents a connection handle to the EIS

Provides a method for applications to submit trades to the EIS

TradeConnectionFactory

Enables applications to obtain connection handles to the EIS

TradeProcessingException

Indicates that a problem occurred processing a trade request

The ResourceAccessBean managed bean in the trading-war module configures a connection factory for the trading-rar resource adapter by using the @ConnectionFactoryDefinition annotation as follows:

@Named
@SessionScoped
@ConnectionFactoryDefinition(
    name = "java:comp/env/eis/TradeConnectionFactory",
    interfaceName = "javaeetutorial.trading.rar.api.TradeConnectionFactory",
    resourceAdapter = "#trading-rar",
    minPoolSize = 5,
    transactionSupport =
            TransactionSupport.TransactionSupportLevel.NoTransaction
)
public class ResourceAccessBean implements Serializable { ... }

The name parameter specifies the JNDI name for the connection factory. This example registers the connection factory in the java:comp scope. You can use the ConnectionFactoryDefinition annotation to specify a different scope, such as java:global, java:app, or java:module. The AdministeredObjectDefinition annotation also enables you to register administered connector objects in the JNDI namespace.

The interfaceName parameter specifies the interface implemented by the connection factory included in the resource adapter. In this example, this is a custom interface.

The resourceAdapter parameter specifies the name of the resource adapter that contains the connection factory implementation. The # prefix in #trading-rar indicates that trading-rar is an embedded resource adapter that is bundled in the same EAR as this web application.

Note:

You can also configure a connection factory for a previously deployed outbound resource adapter using the administration commands from your application server. However, this is a vendor-specific procedure.

The managed bean obtains a connection factory object using resource injection as follows:

...
public class ResourceAccessBean implements Serializable {
    @Resource(lookup = "java:comp/env/eis/TradeConnectionFactory")
    private TradeConnectionFactory connectionFactory;
    ...
}

The managed bean uses the connection factory to obtain connection handles as follows:

TradeConnection connection = connectionFactory.getConnection();

The resource adapter returns a connection handle associated with a physical connection to the EIS. Once a connection handle is available, the managed bean submits a trade and obtains the response as follows:

TradeOrder order = new TradeOrder();
order.setNShares(1000);
order.setTicker(TradeOrder.Ticker.YYYY);
order.setOrderType(TradeOrder.OrderType.BUY);
order.setOrderClass(TradeOrder.OrderClass.MARKET);
...
try {
    TradeResponse response = connection.submitOrder(order);
    ...
} catch (TradeProcessingException ex) { ... }

Implementing the Outbound Resource Adapter

The trading-rar module implements the outbound contract and a custom client interface for the simple legacy stock trading platform EIS used in this example. The architecture of the outbound resource adapter is shown in Figure 56-2.

Figure 56-2 Architecture of the trading Example

This figure shows the classes in each of the modules of the trading example.

The trading-rar module implements the interfaces listed in Table 56-2.

Table 56-2 Interfaces Implemented in the trading-rar Module

Package

Interface

Description

javax.resource.spi

ResourceAdapter

Defines the lifecycle methods of the resource adapter

javax.resource.spi

ManagedConnectionFactory

Defines a connection factory that the connection manager from the application server uses to obtain physical connections to the EIS

javax.resource.spi

ManagedConnection

Defines a physical connection to the EIS that can be managed by the connection manager

trading.rar.api

TradeConnectionFactory

Defines a connection factory that applications use to obtain connection handles

trading.rar.api

TradeConnection

Defines a connection handle that applications use to interact with the EIS

When the trading-ear archive is deployed and a connection pool resource is configured as described in Using the Outbound Resource Adapter, the application server creates TradeConnectionFactory objects that applications can obtain using resource injection. The TradeConnectionFactory implementation delegates creating connections to the connection manager provided by the application server.

The connection manager uses the ManagedConnectionFactory implementation to obtain physical connections to the EIS and maintains a pool of active physical connections. When an application requests a connection handle, the connection manager associates a connection from the pool with a new connection handle that the application can use. Connection pooling improves application performance and simplifies resource adapter development.

For more details, see the code and the comments in the trading-rar module.

Running the trading Example

You can use either NetBeans IDE or Maven to build, package, deploy, and run the trading example.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Run the trading Example Using NetBeans IDE

  1. Make sure that GlassFish Server has been started (see Starting and Stopping GlassFish Server).

  2. From the File menu, choose Open Project.

  3. In the Open Project dialog box, navigate to:

    tut-install/examples/connectors
  4. Select the trading folder.

  5. Click Open Project.

  6. In the Projects tab, expand the trading node.

  7. Right-click the trading-eis module and select Open Project.

  8. Right-click the trading-eis project and select Run.

    The messages from the EIS appear in the Output tab:

    Trade execution server listening on port 4004.
  9. Right-click the trading-ear project and select Build.

    This command packages the resource adapter and the web application in an EAR file and deploys it to GlassFish Server.

  10. Open the following URL in a web browser:

    http://localhost:8080/trading/

    The web interface enables you to connect to the EIS and submit trades. The server log shows the requests from the web application and the call sequence that provides connection handles from the resource adapter.

  11. Before undeploying the trading-ear application, close the trading-eis application from the status bar.

To Run the trading Example Using Maven

  1. Make sure that GlassFish Server has been started (see Starting and Stopping GlassFish Server).

  2. In a terminal window, go to:

    tut-install/examples/connectors/trading/
  3. Enter the following command:

    mvn install

    This command builds and packages the resource adapter and the web application into an EAR archive and deploys it to GlassFish Server.

  4. In the same terminal window, go to the trading-eis directory:

    cd trading-eis
  5. Enter the following command to run the trade execution platform:

    mvn exec:java

    The messages from the EIS appear in the terminal window:

    Trade execution server listening on port 4004.
  6. Open the following URL in a web browser:

    http://localhost:8080/trading/

    The web interface enables you to connect to the EIS and submit trades. The server log shows the requests from the web application and the call sequence that provides connection handles from the resource adapter.

  7. Before undeploying the trading-ear application, press Ctrl+C on the terminal window to close the trading-eis application.


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